Galop Seeks Victims of Outdated, Homophobic Law

Following a feature article in The Guardian (read the article here), Galop is seeking other men who have been affected by the law which forces them to reveal past convictions of buggery or gross indecency to potential employers.

Galop has been supporting John Crawford, who was convicted of buggery in 1959. John was subjected to horrendous treatment by the police at the time, including being incarcerated, repeatedly beaten and prevented from sleeping, and threatened with further violence from the police, all in order to extract a confession from him.

John came to Galop for support because his conviction, for an offence which is no longer illegal (following changes to the Sexual Offences Act 2003), kept appearing on his enhanced criminal records bureau check when he applied for volunteer positions working with vulnerable clients. John is also forced to reveal his conviction on job applications where he is asked about previous convictions.

Galop supported John to get legal representation from Anna Mazzola at Hickman and Rose, and is now looking for others who may have had similar experiences, and who may be interested in joining a potential legal action.

Deborah Gold, Galop Chief Executive said, “the enforcement of this law is effectively re-criminalising John and others like him, forcing him to repeatedly re-live his worst experiences, and causing him to have to out himself to potential employers. Galop demands that the police and the Home office change the rules so that no one else is forced to suffer in the way that John has”.

Galop provides advice and support to anyone in this situation, including providing detailed advice on its website about how to challenge the police on revealing his information.  Anyone who has been affected is urged to contact us on our Shoutline on 020 7704 2040.